Latest Stories

  1. Welcome to the team Frances

    Welcome to the team Frances

    A warm welcome to Frances Whyte, who joins the team as our HR Administrator as Chris Davis retires after 22 years of service at the end of March; Frances is already proving to be a great addition to the team and has a great career ahead of her, see what she had to say about her new role below:

    1. What will your new role include?

    My new role will involve being responsible for all of the different elements of HR administration at Johnsons of Whixley.

     

    2. Where have you worked previously?

    Previously, I worked as a primary school teacher in York for several years, teaching children in Year 5 and 6.

     

    3. What skills do you think you will transfer from your old career to your new career?

    Managing a varied workload and juggling lots of different tasks!

     

    4. What are you looking forward to most?

    I’m really looking forward to starting my career in HR and learning lots of new skills.

     

    5. What do you think the biggest challenge will be?

    Remembering everybody’s names and where they all work!

     

    6. Tell us something you have learnt since being here:

    I’ve learnt a lot already – how to use the time and attendance systems, how to issue contracts of employment, how to create and maintain personal files and so much more!

     

    7. What have you enjoyed the most since starting?

    I’ve really enjoyed getting to know everyone that I’ve met so far, and also working in an office environment.

     

    8. Tell us something you enjoy getting up to outside of work:

    Outside of work, I enjoy reading, photography and spending time with my friends and family.

     

    9. What is your favourite dish?

    Definitely pizza!

     

    10. Favourite TV show?

    My favourite TV shows are Brooklyn 99, The Office and Schitt’s Creek.

     

     Marketing Manager Eleanor Richardson said: “Frances is a bright and bubbly character, who is a great asset to the business; its been great to have her join our team; I look forward to working with her going forward and wish her all the best with her HR career.”

     

    Posted 25th Feb 11:11am
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  2. A warm welcome to Paul

    A warm welcome to Paul

    A warm welcome to Paul Whellans, who joins our sales team as an estimator. He is a great addition to the team and is settling in well with the sales team and wider office. See what he had to say about his role and joining Johnsons below:

    1)How have you found your first few weeks at Johnsons and what have you enjoyed most?

    Enjoyed the outdoor work after 20+ years in an office, In all honesty, had a bit of wobble when I joined the estimating team so soon as it’s so in-depth however I’ve given myself some credit and now I’m really enjoying the work.

    2)Tell us something you’ve learnt that you didn’t know before:

    Probably navigating SAP, I used it many years ago in utilities and it wasn’t user friendly for that industry but for stock control and pricing its been spot on.

    3)What do you think the biggest challenge will be?

    Getting to grips with the millions of varieties we offer.

    4)What was your previous job role?

    Customer Mortgage Expert for Barclays.

    5)You recently moved from the North East, what will you miss the most?

    Running with the pooch along the beach.

    6)What do you like most about Yorkshire (Gods County)?

    So far the quiet, small village life isn’t too bad.

    7)Favourite season and why:

    Has to be summer, love the heat. Actually don’t mind the winter (lived in Nova Scotia, Canada) for 6 years and experienced -31 most winters although not a fan of rain.

    8)What do you enjoy getting up to outside of work?

    Walk’s with the dog, coffee in front of the log burner, travel and anything fitness related, attended a few bodybuilding expo’s in Vegas and Ohio.

    General Amenity Sales Manager Vicky Newell said: “Paul has been a great asset to our team, he has settled into estimating really well, it feels like he has been here for years even though he has only been with us a few weeks.”

    Posted 25th Feb 10:34am
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  3. Farewell Chris Davis

    Farewell Chris Davis

    Farewell to Chris Davis our HR Administrator who retires after 22 years at Johnsons of Whixley at the end of March, Chris has provided support to all business areas for many years and has developed an unrivalled ‘plate spinning’ capability as she dashes from one task to the next in the office and beyond; we thank you for your hard work, loyalty and commitment, you will be greatly missed.

    1) Where did you work prior to Johnsons?

    • Harrogate General Hospital – I was an auxiliary nurse on the then maternity ward
    • Knaresborough Hospital – I was an auxiliary nurse on the rehabilitation wards
    • Various nursing homes –nursing assistant working the night shifts, which fitted around having my children.
    • Sainsbury’s – I was checkout assistant and then Customer service supervisor

    2) What roles have you had while working at Johnsons?

    Order processor, General Admin Manager, Customer Service Manager, HR coordinator / Admin Manager.

    3) What was your happiest experience at this company?

    There have been a few, attending company functions etc but receiving an email of thanks from one of our advisors was lovely and meant a lot.

    4) What will you miss the most?

    Chatting with colleagues

    5) Tell us a funny story from your time at Johnsons: Ian Nelson as he passed me, would sometimes push me around the office on my chair, he did not do it all the time so it was a surprise when he did.

    6)What advice would you give to the person taking on your role?

    Expect the unexpected every day and you will have a busy timetable.

    7)If you could have worked anywhere else, where would it have been?

    Can’t think of anywhere otherwise I would have gone

    8)What changes have you seen in the company over the years?

    The number of the office staff has doubled and there have been massive technology and system changes, therefore some of the intimacy we had has unfortunately been lost.

    9)What is the first thing you will do when you retire?

    Hopefully get a full night’s sleep, not waking up thinking of stuff. I will enjoy and make good use of my free time.

    Group Managing Director, Graham Richardson said: ” Even in our long 101year history, few staff members could boast such a significant and influential impact on our business. Chris’s can-do attitude and unshakeable reliability are simply unique, she will be greatly missed.” 

     

    Posted 21st Feb 3:27pm
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  4. A fond farewell to Ian Nelson

    A fond farewell to Ian Nelson

    We bid a fond farewell to Ian Nelson at the end of this month as he retires after 36 years + of service with us at Johnsons. Ian has been involved with many different positions across the nursery, from general nursery work to spraying and production manager from 2003 until recently. See what he had to say about his time at Johnsons below:

    1) How long have you worked at JOW for? If you exclude my Student middle year, then it’s 36.5 years.

    2) Did you work anywhere else prior to Johnsons? Yep, loads of places. I left school (their decision) in 1971, aged 15. I started out dairy farming, which I liked as a job, but had to live in a weird family!! I did a heap of jobs over the next couple of years (you could leave a job in the morning & line up another one in the day) – my shortest job was 45 minutes in the Ansaphone factory, which definitely wasn’t for me. I was scaffolding for some time before making a career choice of nursing which was good for 3 years or so. Ultimately, I started with the plants for Darlington Borough Council in 1979 and realised this was what I wanted to do, so I studied at night school for A Levels & went to Askham Bryan to do an HND (& I have never looked at those files since!!). Although it wasn’t a conventional early career, and I wasn’t the most reliable of employees, all those jobs I did gave me something.

    3) What roles have you been involved in on the nursery? I can rightly claim it is from the bottom up. I Did my shift of tying-up roses. The first promotion was taking charge of the spraying. That grew into being Technical Manager. Things got bolted on to that remit as the nursery grew. I moved over to being Production Manager at the very start of 2003.

    4) What have you enjoyed the most about your time at JOW? a bit corny but it is mostly about the people. There’s been a good team spirit. The culture of the company has suited me. Quite possibly would have been sacked years ago in a wholly conventional workplace. I am a plants-person, so the new introductions and range changes kept me interested, and you can’t escape the fact that you do get satisfaction from successes that you’ve been an integral part of.

    5) Funniest memory from working here? Well, Terry & Dave wouldn’t be too impressed, and I am probably going back 25+years, but Cyril Burnham driving the Land Rover in the fields at Endfield had us laughing. He was 65 & had never driven a vehicle before. You missed a character for those of you who don’t remember him, Tweedy. Perhaps now there aren’t as many characters as there were – Yapper, Jim Illingworth would brighten up your day even when you were working in a muddy field.

    6) If you could have done any other career, what would it have been? In a perfect world, I’d have liked to have been an architect – and designed something that was still admired years later.

    7) What has changed most over the years? That depends on how long you look back. Going right back to when I started was an extremely seasonal job. At times it was a struggle to keep looking busy in the summer, but in the ‘season’, you’d find yourself lifting trees in the pitch black and then bagging & loading until 9.00 in the evening. Over the last 20 years, change has been more gradual, we’ve got bigger and probably better, but radical change is less evident.

    8) Any exciting plans for retirement? I’m going to have a little business, but I want to work only part-time. I’m a Director at the golf club and have responsibilities there. Now that travel is becoming more feasible; we’ll be travelling again, still many countries to experience. I expect we’ll spend more time up at the cottage in Scotland. So plenty to look forward to. But I’m sure it will, certainly initially, feel strange not coming to the place you’ve been arriving at before 7.30 for the last 35+ years.

    Robert Richardson took over from Ian Nelson in 2020; you can find out more about him and production at Johnsons 100 years on by clicking here

     

    Posted 8th Feb 11:45am
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  5. A new role for Sarah Greenwood

    A new role for Sarah Greenwood

    Congratulations to Sarah Greenwood who has recently taken on a duo role as Sales Estimator/Administration Assistant, see what she had to say about the  new role below:

    1)What will your duo role involve?

    A combination of assisting with quotes for Estimating and general Sales Operations admin for example altering orders and Seed Certificates.

    2)What are you looking forward to most in your new role?

    Expanding my knowledge on plants and learning about another area of Johnsons.

    3)What have the challenges been so far?

    Learning and remembering all the new information on how to do quotes.

    4)What did you do prior to working at Johnsons?

    I was at University studying Geography and then I worked at Beningbrough Hall in the café.

    5)What do you like most about working at Johnsons?

    The people, the variety of things you can do and of course the food days.

    6)Favourite TV series?

    Top Gear.

    7)Favourite food?

    Spaghetti Bolognese.

    8)Tell us something we don’t know about you:

    I worked as a stable groom when I was a teenager.

    General Amenity Sales Manager, Vicky Newell said: “ Sarah has joined our team and has fit in seamlessly. She has been a real asset to our team and has been able to impart her vast knowledge of SAP to the rest of the sales team too.  “

    Posted 2nd Feb 12:51pm
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  6. February Gardening Reminders 2022

    February Gardening Reminders 2022

    Winter is on the way out this month as the first signs of spring start to appear, with bulbs such as snowdrops starting to emerge. There’s plenty to be doing this month in the garden, from planting to final winter pruning and cleaning out the bird boxes for #BirdFeedingMonth. Check out our hints and tips put together by our chairman and Horticulturist, John Richardson below.

    Plant container-grown perennials for an early start to the spring. If large plants, consider carefully dividing them before planting; we all enjoy getting a bit extra at no cost !!

    Be sure to water root-balls before planting. If there is a dry spring, it may significantly slow growth.

    Apply a mulch of garden compost, mushroom compost etc., to all trees and shrubs in potentially dry sites. No need to incorporate it into the soil; worms will do it for you! Don’t apply mushroom compost, which has a high lime content, to acid-loving plants such as Azaleas & Rhododendrons.

    Finish winter pruning this month. First-principles are to remove dead and diseased stems, then cross branches, followed by a reduction in the height of the main stems in the case of roses.

    Cut bushy Eucalyptus back to within 2-3″ of the main stem to stimulate a flush of bushy growth.

    Examine stored Dahlia tubers and place them in a tub of tepid water overnight if they have shrivelled. Cutaway diseased areas of the tubers that have rotted and dust the cuts with flowers of sulphur.

    Do not apply heavy dressings of fertilizer to areas of naturalized bulbs as this will only encourage the growth of the surrounding grass.

    Prune shrub roses in late February to encourage growth from the base. Remove some of the old weedy shoots but don’t reduce height too much as they tend to flower on older wood.

    Divide and replant Snowdrops ‘in the green’ as the flowers go over.

    Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries, blackcurrants etc. and heel-in, in a protected area.

    When the ground is firm, repair any uneven areas of the lawn or where the grass has died out.

    Pot up or transplant last year’s rooted hardwood cuttings.

    If the weather warms up, take the opportunity to prepare compost and boxes for sowing half-hardy annuals by the end of the month. You should have a heat source available for cold nights.

    Cut back Clematis Jackmanii and C. Viticella groups to about 12″. Pyracantha should be pruned to within 2 buds of the mainframe except for extensions, if not done last autumn.

    Put a suitable number of chitted potatoes into a good-sized plastic pot and cover with 20cm of compost. Water as appropriate and continue to add compost as foliage growth continues. Leave to mature and water frequently. Harvest the potatoes when foliage begins to die back.

    Clean out and sterilize existing bird nesting boxes and erect new ones. Feed the birds!

    Propagate a wide range of woody shrubs by layering, towards the end of the month. Peg down a young shoot into the soil under the shrub/tree without detaching it from the tree, but make a cut in the underneath of the stem, or twist it at the point where it will turn it upwards. Pin this down with a suitable forked twig into a couple of handfuls of compost water, and hold firm with a suitable stone. Tie the growing shoot to a small cane to keep it upright and trim to prevent moving in the wind.

    Posted 2nd Feb 11:59am
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  7. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for February

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for February

    Theirs plenty of interest in the plant world in February as the first signs of spring start to emerge with snowdrops popping up and plants in bud, here are some of our favourite February varieties below:

    Camellia varieties in bud

    Some of our Camellia plants are in full bud right now (start of February) this plant makes a great addition to a partially shaded border or large pot with luscious green foliage and flowers available in shades of pink, red and white.

    🌸Flowers: February – April (depending on the variety)

    🌞 Position: Partial shade (not east-facing)

    📏 Height: Up to4m + (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moist but well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Sarcococca confusa

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    🌞 Position: Partial – deep shade

    🌸Flowers: December – March

    📏 Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Salix varieties with catkins such as ‘Mount Aso’

    Fuzzy pink catkins appear on varieties such as ‘Mount Aso’ during late winter – early spring, a wonderful eye-catching addition to the garden.

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    🌸Flowers: April – May

    📏 Height: Up to 4m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Moist but well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    🌸Flowers:  April – May (depending on variety) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    🌞 Position: Partial – full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance, easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    🌸Flowers:  December – April

    🌞 Position: Full sun or partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Magnolia varieties in bud

    Another sign that spring is on its way… Magnolias in bud, these varieties generally flower from March-April onwards but some may appear towards the end of February.

    🌸Flowers:  March – April onwards

    🌞 Position: Full sun or partial shade (depending on the variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 10m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    🌸Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Hamamelis varieties

    Hamamelis plants are covered in branches of distinctive, spider-like, fragrant flowers in red, yellow, and orange shades from January to early spring.

    Whilst slow growing this plant variety can become a large spreading shrub or small tree. A fantastic specimen plant that will make a great addition to the middle or back of a border.

    Plant in well-drained, neutral acid soil in full sun to partial shade for best results.

    🌸Flowers: January – February

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    Pot size: 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Helleborus varieties 

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    🌸 Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    🌞Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

     

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

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    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    🌸Flowers: January – March

    ☀️ Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

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    Nandina varieties such as ‘domestica’ and ‘Fire Power’ 

    Nandinas provide autumn- winter interest when leaves turn shades of fiery red and copper.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    🌸Flowers:  July  (depending on variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L, 10L, 20L, 25L +

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    Pieris varieties in bud

    Pieris plants generally flower from March-May but buds start to appear as pictured in February. Ideal for a partially shaded shrub border with flowers resembling lily-of-the-valley and available in shades of pink, red and white.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    🌸Flowers:  March-May  (depending on variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L (depending on the variety and availability)

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    Click here for more monthly plantspo

    Posted 3rd Feb 10:46am
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  8. The Growers Plantspo - Plants for March Interest

    The Growers Plantspo - Plants for March Interest

    March sees us cross over from winter to spring, with spring bringing with it many more flowering varieties from Bergenia to Vincas providing exciting spring colour as we see bees starting to emerge and birds making a return from migration. Check out some of our favourite March flowering varieties below

    Bergenia varieties such as ‘Silberlicht’ and cordifolia ‘Purpurea’

    Bergenia’s large leathery leaves make attractive ground cover, while its flowers provide an early source of pollen for bees and other pollinating insects.

    🌸Flowers: March – April

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m depending on the variety

     Soil: Any soil type

     Pot size: 2L, 3L  (subject to availability and the variety)

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    Chaenomeles varieties such as ‘Jet Trail, ‘Crimson & Gold’ & ‘Nivalis’

    A great addition to a wall or fence in the sun or partial shade-providing colour in early spring when little else is flowering. Flowers are available in pink, red and white.

    🌸Flowers: March – May

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m

     Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 3LD, 5L (subject to availability and the variety)

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    Camellia varieties

    Some of our Camellia plants are in full bud right now (start of February) this plant makes a great addition to a partially shaded border or large pot with luscious green foliage and flowers available in shades of pink, red and white.

    🌸Flowers: February – April (depending on the variety)

    🌞 Position: Partial shade (not east-facing)

    📏 Height: Up to4m + (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: moist but well-drained, humus-rich, acid soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L + ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Cornus varieties such as ‘Midwinter Fire’, and ‘Sibrica’ 

    Cornus are known for their coloured stems that are revealed when their leaves fall. Shades of red, yellow and orange stems are available.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  moderately fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L,  10L ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Corylopsis pauciflora

    Sweetly scented yellow flowers appear on bare stems during March and April gollowed by bronzed, hazel like leaves which mature to bright green.

    🌸Flowers: March – April

    🌞 Position: Ppartial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well drained ,acid soil

    Pot size: 10L, 20L ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    🌸 Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

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    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    🌸Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

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    Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’ 

    Yellow flowers smother branches from March – April providing a notable cheery sight to the start of spring. Try planting at the back of a dull border or even as a hedge with its full height reaching 2 meters.

    🌸Flowers:  February to April

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun or light shade

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained, neutral soil

    Pot size: Available in 2L  and 3L pots subject to availability.

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    Helleborus varieties 

    Hellebores are compact, clump-forming perennials with dark green, leathery leaves and stunning flowers.

    A tremendous shade-loving border plant that will brighten up your garden when little else is flowering from December – March.

    🌸 Flowers: December – March (depending on the variety)

    🌞Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 45cn (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Heavy, neutral to alkaline soil

    2L, 3L

    It would help if you planted in partial to full shade for best results and cut back old leaves in January – February to show off new flowers.

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    Jasminum nudiflorum

    A deciduous climber with bright yellow flowers that appear on bare stems in winter and early spring helping to brighten up a dark winter’s day. This attractive climber will grow well against a trellis or low wall once trained as it is not self-clinging.

    🌸Flowers: January – March

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

    Pot size:  2LD, 3LD  ( subject to availability)

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    Kerria japonica ‘Pleniflora’

    A great addition to the garden, brighting up a dark corner, with double yellow flowers that burst from mid-late spring.

    🌸Flowers: March-May

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Prunus Kojo-no-Mai

    A pretty deciduous shrub with zig-zag branches and crimson buds that open to display white flowers with pink centres in early spring. Its luscious green leaves appear after the summer months and are then followed by bright reddish/orange leaves before falling in the Autumn. A perfect small compact tree for a smaller garden or patio pot.

    🌸Flowers: March-April

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Magnolia x soulangeana and the variety ‘Susan’

    Another sign that spring is on its way… Magnolias in bud, these varieties generally flower from March-April onwards but some may appear towards the end of February.

    🌸Flowers:  March – April onwards

    🌞 Position: Full sun or partial shade (depending on the variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 10m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acidic soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Mahonia varieties such as ‘Charity’ and ‘Winter Sun’

    Are the perfect addition to a shaded spot in your garden as they prefer full – partial shade with spikes of yellow flowers from November through to March that has a fragrant reminiscent of lily-of-the-valley on dark green holly-like leaves. Prune in spring after flowering.

    🌸Flowers:  November – March (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, fertile, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Pieris varieties such as ‘Passion’

    Pieris plants generally flower from March-May but buds start to appear in February. Ideal for a partially shaded shrub border with flowers resembling lily-of-the-valley and available in shades of pink, red and white.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    🌸Flowers:  March-May  (depending on variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: humus-rich, moist, well-drained acid soil or ericaceous compost

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L, 20L (depending on the variety and availability)

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    Sarcococca confusa

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    🌞 Position: Partial – deep shade

    🌸Flowers: December – March

    📏 Height: Up to 2m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 1m (depending on the variety)

    Soil:  fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Salix varieties with catkins such as ‘Mount Aso’

    Fuzzy pink catkins appear on varieties such as ‘Mount Aso’ during late winter – early spring, a wonderful eye-catching addition to the garden.

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    🌸Flowers: April – May

    📏 Height: Up to 4m (depending on the variety)

    📏 Width: Up to 3m (depending on the variety)

    Soil: Moist but well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3LD, 5L,  10L  ( subject to availability and the variety)

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    Skimmia varieties such as ‘Rubella’ and ‘Kew Green’

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    🌸Flowers:  End of March – May (depending on variety and whether its a male or female cultivar) flower buds are seen in autumn-winter.

    🌞 Position: Partial – full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist-well-drained, acid soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Viburnum varieties such as ‘tinus’ and ‘bod Dawn’

    Evergreen Viburnums such as tinus are a great shrub for winter interest with dark green leaves and clusters of tiny white flowers from December to April.

    A great low maintenance, easy to grow shrub that can brighten a part shaded area of the garden when little else is flowering.

    🌸Flowers:  December – April

    🌞 Position: Full sun or partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist-well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Vinca varieties such as ‘major’, minor’ and ‘atropurpurea’ 

    A great low growing ground cover plant with pale blue flowers and lance-shaped dark green leaves. It is excellent at suppressing weeds and would make a great addition to the front of a border. It generally flowers from April – September.

    🌸Flowers: End of March- April – September

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.45m depending on the variety

    Soil: any but very dry soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Posted 22nd Feb 9:40am
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