Latest Stories

  1. Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    Celebrating 30 years of quality accreditation

    We are celebrating achieving the BSI ISO 9001 Quality re-accreditation for the 30th year in a row.

    We have achieved the ISO 9001 Quality Management,  since 1991. We have also re-achieved ISO 14001 Environment Management standards since April 2010.

    Supplying 5-6 million plants throughout the UK each year, our plants embellish their surroundings and make a positive contribution to the environment.

    The ISO 9001 Quality Management is a clearly defined set of business processes, which defines Johnsons’ commitment to creating products and services following pre-defined standards. ISO 9001 is internationally recognised and one of the most popular international quality management systems.

    ISO 14001 is the international standard that specifies requirements for an effective environmental management system for businesses. It provides a framework that a business can follow of standards on environmental management. Integrating it with other management systems standards, like ISO 9001, can further assist in accomplishing organisational goals.

    We have also invested in 3 new electric 4 x 4 Hisun buggies this month, the robust vehicles will be trialled on the nurseries five sites with a view to replace all dumper trucks by 2025. One charge can last an impressive full working day and will be used to tow trailers and bespoke equipment.

    Graham Richardson, Managing Director at Johnsons of Whixley, said: “We are proud and delighted to have achieved the BSI ISO Quality accreditation for the 30th year in a row. It demonstrates our dedication to adhering to an external system of quality management and environmental standards to ensure the best quality products and services to current, new and potential customers. The new electric buggies are also a great addition and will reduce costs and further enhance our environmental credentials significantly in years to come.”

    Posted 6th Oct 2:42pm
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  2. Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back Vicky Newell

    Welcome back to a familiar face, Vicky Newell who re-joins our team as General Amenity Sales Manager. See what she says about her new role, and what it’s like to be back below

    1. How does it feel to be back?

    It is great to be back and to see so many familiar faces.

    2. Has much changed at Johnsons?

    Technology has changed considerable, being paperless takes some getting used to. The new quotation tool is amazing and enables many more amenity quotations to be done consistently whether they come in spreadsheet or PDF format.

    3. What will your new role involve?

    My time will be split 3 ways – managing the Amenity sales department, looking after my own Amenity accounts and generating more Amenity business (happy to listen if anyone has any great ideas on the last one !)

    4. What are you looking forward to most about your new role?

    I would like to make a difference and the more the team talks to our customers (new and old), we can improve our offer which will hopefully will generate new opportunities

    5. What do you think the challenges will be?

    Being able to fulfil customer expectations within the ever-decreasing timescales

    6. Tell us something we don’t know about you 

    I help out Knaresborough in Bloom, so can be seen planting, deadheading and watering the tubs and container in Knaresborough from time to time

    7. What do you like to get up to outside of work?

    I have 5 allotments with a friend, so that takes up most of my time on a Sunday, fighting against the weeds!

    8. Favourite food?
    I love Italian food but I am also partial to the odd slice or two of cake!

    Posted 5th Oct 1:11pm
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  3. October Gardening Reminders 2021

    October Gardening Reminders 2021

    The temperatures have dropped and trees & shrubs are changing colour  –  autumn is officially here, but there’s still plenty to be doing in the garden this month from planting bulbs to taking cuttings; below are some hints and tips put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1) Give conifer hedges a final trim and finish planting evergreen shrubs while the soil is still warm, and new roots will develop quickly.

    2) Lift and store carrots and potatoes. Cut back strong stems of tall shrubs like lavatera and Buddleia to half their length to prevent winter damage. Complete the cutting back to 15 inches in February/March.

    3) Collect the seed of those plants you may wish to increase and will come true from seed. Store seed in paper bags in a sealed container on the bottom shelf of a refrigerator. If unsure when to sow the seed, sow half on the collection and the other half in the spring.

    4) At the end of October give the glasshouses and frames a thorough clean both inside and outside. Scrub down the benches with a mild disinfectant before hosing down the entire area.

    5) If you have electricity in the glasshouse, check that the earth-breaker is undamaged and clean.

    6) Fix grease bands to the trunks of apple and pear trees.

    7) Clean out ponds and water features, and remove water pumps for the winter.

    8) Repair broken fences, patios, trellises, steps, fall pipes and walls.

    9) Take hardwood cuttings of forsythia, deutzia, honeysuckle, jasmine, Virginia creeper, holly, privet, cotoneaster, poplar, willow, gooseberries, blackcurrants etc., at the end of the month.

    10) Make several collections through the month of fallen leaves, and store them in a wire-netting enclosed area to ensure they rot down over winter. Do not leave fallen leaves on the lawn.

    11) Clean out leaves from around alpine plants. If permanently outside and not in a cold frame, cover with a pinned down sheet of glass over winter to prevent the plants from becoming water-logged.

    12) Lift Dahlias, Gladioli, and other tender perennials when temperatures fall sharply and store them in a frost-free place.

    13) This is a good month to lay turf providing the ground has been firmed, raked, levelled and weeded.

    14) If the weather warms up at the end of the month, take the opportunity to prepare compost and boxes for sowing half-hardy annuals by the end of the month. You should have a heat source available for frost prevention on cold nights

    15) Be sure to have a stock of sand or salt for very frosty mornings when paths and roads are slippery.

    16) Plant new daffodils, but don’t plant tulips until mid-November to reduce the risk of Tulip Fire Disease.

    17) When planting new trees larger than 2m., place a diagonal stake into the prevailing wind to prevent the tree from leaning over in the first year.

    18) Remember, when selecting shrubs, birds don’t like yellow berries!!

    19) lift and divide rhubarb crowns at 5-year intervals, a spade is the best implement to use!

    Interested in plants that are looking good this October, click here to view

     

     

    Posted 4th Oct 1:01pm
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