Latest Stories

  1. Welcome to the team Rob

    Welcome to the team Rob

    A warm welcome to Rob Forrester who joins the team as Procurement Manager, find out what he had to say about his new role below:

    1) What are you looking forward to most about your new role? Getting out around the UK & Europe to meet our suppliers (when travel permits) and solidifying our strong relationships.

    2)Anything you’ve learnt in the last couple of weeks that you didn’t know before? A lot! I’ve come from a non-horticulture background, so I’m learning lots of new things every single day!

    3)What do you think the challenges of this role will be? Dealing with new legislation/regulations in the aftermath of Brexit/Covid.

    What would we find you doing on a weekend? Playing football for Poppleton United or spending time with my wife, daughter and dog.

    Favourite food? Got to be curry- specifically Lamb Madras!

    Favourite band? I like my rock music- if I had to pick a favourite I’d probably go with Muse.

    Summer or winter? Summer

    Tell us an interesting fact about yourself: I once had a drawing of mine on display at York Art Gallery, despite being absolutely terrible at art.

    Posted 17th Jun 10:17am
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  2. A new role for Tom Chilton

    A new role for Tom Chilton

    Congratulations to Tom Chilton, who has taken on the role of Roecliffe Assistant Manager as the previous Assistant Manager, Tony Tillet retired after 32 years.

    Find out what he had to say about his new role below:

    1.What are you most looking forward to in your new role?

    Managing the day to day running of the Roecliffe site and working with the team to produce great plants. It will also be great to see myself “grow” as a manager and further myself as a Horticulturalist.

    2. What was your previous role within the company?

    My main role within Johnsons has been on the production side of the company, I enrolled on the rising stars course soon after joining the company, and I have worked closely with Eric Buckby in the container unit potting shed, which I ended up managing for several weeks in his absence due to the Pandemic.

    3.What do you enjoy most about working at Johnsons?

    I have a general passion for plants. I have been around horticulture my whole life. The Johnsons community is also fantastic I have worked with so many great people here, the Richardson family make you feel very welcome, and I like the happy, upbeat environment in which we work.

    4.What did you do before working at Johnsons? Where did you study?

    Previous to Johnsons I worked for Summerfield Nursery at Poppleton, York. Summerfield grows a fantastic range of plants which they sell to the public and trade customers, I enjoyed my time there.  I had worked there since I was 15. I wouldn’t be where I am now if it wasn’t for them. I studied Horticulture at Askham Bryan College in York.

    5.What do you enjoy doing outside of work?

    I enjoy sport, including road/mountain biking and golf, and I have an allotment in which I grow exhibition vegetables and dahlias.

    6. Tell us a random fact about yourself

    At 21, I’m still a baby; I still can’t swim; no matter how much I try, I can’t do it!

    Posted 17th Jun 8:33am
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  3. Proud to have sold 220 million plants during our century of business

    Proud to have sold 220 million plants during our century of business

    We are proud to have sold around 220 million plants during our century of business.

    Our family business was founded by war veteran Eric Johnson in June 1921 and was bought by John Richardson in 1964; it has been owned by the Richardson family since.

    Notable projects include the Forth Road Bridge, HS1, Royal Parks, The Athletes Village at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games, The National Trust, Studley Royal Gardens, a five-star hotel, Grantley Hall, and the UK’s largest science campus.

    Founder Eric Johnson started the company with minimum assets and a small piece of land bearing a couple of dozen fruit trees. He went on to produce a range of vegetables, fruit and garden plants that he sold directly from the nursery.

    After a year he took on his first employee and bought a model T Ford lorry. He began selling his stock from markets in Knaresborough and Otley markets while selling plants from home at weekends.

    As the business continued to flourish, he took on more employees and began to import plants from Holland.

    But the Second World War was a setback. Eric saw all but one of his staff join the war effort; he stopped growing ornamentals and concentrated instead on producing vegetables. He was given a commission with the Home Guard, with a platoon of 60 covering the area between Walshford Bridge and Skip Bridge along the River Nidd to Nun Monkton, back to Green Hammerton and the A1.

    Towards the end of the war, Eric bought seven acres of land in Whixley and ER Johnson Nurseries, based at Cattal & Whixley, was born. The nursery cropped Brussels sprouts, marrows, roses, ornamental trees and shrubs to name but a few.  The first large order was for 100,000 one-year seedling beech, sold to the Forestry Commission; they were all from one year’s crop and a single tree.

    By 1964, when Yorkshire horticulturist John Richardson and his Scottish wife Dorothy took over, the company was producing 150,000 plants annually, many of which were seedlings of hedge plants and rhododendron ponticum. The business employed 11 full-time staff and had a turnover of £30,500.

    John had spent much of his childhood on his grandparents’ market garden at Carlton, between Leeds and Wakefield. Aged 18, he went to Writtle College in Essex and completed a two-year college diploma in horticulture. Leaving college, John worked a full year for Willy and Robert Bean in East Yorkshire on intensive salad crops, while in his spare time he would grow rhubarb roots on borrowed land. He managed to sell the lot to the Bean brothers for £400 – a small fortune when the weekly wage at the time was just £6.50.

    In September 1958 John moved to Surrey to work on the specialist market garden of FA Secret Limited for three years. He spent six months driving lorry-loads of produce from there to Covent Garden wholesale vegetable market. On his return journey, he would have to hand-load either five tons of spent hops from the Guinness brewery in north London or a consignment of horse manure from the Royal Mews, beneath Buckingham Palace.

    He recalls: “On one occasion I was almost arrested as I drove down The Mall and through Admiralty Arch with a load of manure – lorries of any sort, particularly those full of manure, are not allowed down the Mall in front of the palace!”

    By 1961 John had joined Fisons as the commercial representative for horticulture in Scotland, where he met Dorothy. The couple were married in 1962. John knew his heart lay in practical growing so was intrigued when his uncle, who owned a garage in the North Yorkshire village of Whixley, told him the owner wanted to retire. After a grand total of 16 trips from Scotland, the sale of the business was finalized and John was the proud new owner of Johnsons of Whixley.

    Today, Johnsons has almost 200 acres of land and 120 employees, rising to 150 seasonally. The business sells between five and six million plants and trees each year. Despite the pandemic and Brexit, turnover for 2020 was £13.2m the second highest in the company’s history.

    It remains a true family business, with 11 members of the Richardson family performing a variety of roles within the company. John, now 83, is the company chairman and still works a four-day week. His son Graham is the group managing director and makes the business’s overall decisions, with support from his brothers Iain and Andrew, who are directors.

    John’s grandchildren Luke, Robert, Eleanor, Paul, Shaun and Jonathan Richardson are all involved with the business, as is his daughter-in-law Tracey.

    John said: “I always enjoyed physical work and growing things, so my life has been pretty ideal. There have been problems caused by things outside of our control, like the parks no longer buying directly from 1977, Dutch Elm Disease, COVID-19 and Brexit, but we have been able to survive them all so far. 

    “This has not been just my own doing but is thanks to the support of motivated and trusted colleagues who have run the different elements with such professionalism. It is with great pride that I have seen my sons continue to develop the business year on year, and now I watch my grandchildren take up the reins to the even further successful growth of the company.”

    Posted 14th Jun 2:15pm
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  4. The Growers Plantspo - June Herbaceous

    The Growers Plantspo - June Herbaceous

    Want to add colour to your garden projects this month? check out our guide to herbaceous varieties that are looking good this June from Achillea to Tradescantia.

    Herbaceous varieties looking good this June  

    Achillea varieties such as ‘Terracotta’, ‘Cloth of Gold’ and ‘Moon Dust

    Achilleas are a great addition to a mixed border or cottage garden in full sun – partial shade with flat-topped flowers that bloom from June – September with many cultivars and colours to choose from ranging from yellow to white and pink.

    🌸Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Alchemilla mollis

    🌸Flowers:  June-September (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L

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    Allium varieties such as ‘Purple Sensation’ and ‘Mount Everest’

    🌸Flowers:  May – June

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Astilbe varieties such as ‘Fanal’

    🌸Flowers:  May – June, August (depends on the variety

    🌞 Position: Full sun -partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Astrantia varieties such as ‘Claret’, ‘Hadspen Blood’ and ‘Rosea’

    🌸Flowers: June – August (depends on the variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun -partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, preferably humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L

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    Coreopsis varieties such as ‘Limerock Ruby’, ‘Golden Sphere’ and ‘Sunkiss’

    🌸Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun -partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

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    Dahlia varieties such as ‘Happy Days Pink’, ‘Happy Days Red’ and ‘Happy Days Yellow’

    🌸Flowers: June – September (depends on the variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun -partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

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    Delphinium varieties such as ‘Galahad’ and ‘Magic Fountain Rose Blue White’

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

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    Digitalis varieties such as ‘Albiflora’ and ‘Excelsior Hybrids’

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Humus, rich soil

     Pot size: 2L, 3L

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    Erigeron varieties such as ‘Sea Breeze’ and Erigeron karvinskianus

    🌸Flowers: May – October (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

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    Geranium varieties such as ‘Rozanne’ and ‘Max Frei’ 

    🌸Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L

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    Geum varieties such as ‘Totally Tangerine’, ‘Cosmopolitan’ and ‘Sunrise’

    🌸Flowers: June – August (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

     Pot size: 3L

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    Iris varieties such as pseudacorus, ‘Perry’s Blue’ and ‘Tamberg’

    🌸Flowers: May-June

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained, moderately fertile, neutral to slightly acidic soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

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    Lupinus varieties such as ‘Gladiator’, ‘Persian Slipper’ and ‘Red Rum’

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun- partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L, 5L (depending on variety and subject to availability).

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    Paeonia varieties such as ‘Felix Crousse’ and ‘Bowl of beauty’ 

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun- partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, humus-rich, free-draining soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3LD (depending on variety and subject to availability).

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    Persicaria varieties such as ‘Darjeeling Red’, ‘Superba’ and ‘Delgado’

    🌸Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun- partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Any moist soil

     Pot size: 2l (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Salvia varieties such as ‘Caradonna’, ‘Cherry Lips and ‘Sensation White’

    🌸Flowers: June – October (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1.2m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L,5L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Scabiosa varieties such as ‘Butterfly Blue’, ‘Flutter Deep Blue’ and ‘Flutter Deep Pink’

    🌸Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to slightly alkaline soil

     Pot size: 2l, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Tiarella varieties such as ‘Spring Symphony’ and ‘Pink Symphony’

    🌸Flowers: May – July

    🌞 Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.4m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Cool, moist, humus-rich soil

     Pot size: 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Tradescantia ‘Sweet Kate’

    🌸Flowers: May – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist but well-drained soil

     Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Please note the above plants listed are subject to availability and is not an exhaustive list of what is available, please contact your sales rep direct for specific requests.

    Click here to view our list of June shrub plants that are looking good

     

    Posted 14th Jun 9:51am
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  5. The Growers Plantspo - June Shrubs

    The Growers Plantspo - June Shrubs

    Not sure what’s looking good in the plant world this month? check out our guide to shrub varieties that are looking good this June from Ceanothus to Spirea plants.

    Shrubs looking good this June

    Ceanothus varieties

    🌸Flowers: May – June (depending on variety, varieties such as ‘Puget Blue’ start flowering in April, and others flower for longer than June)

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 3m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Convolvulus cneorum 

    🌸Flowers: May – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil: Poor to moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L (subject to availability)

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    Cistus varieties such as ‘Corbariensis,  ‘Sunset’ and ‘purpureus’. 

    🌸Flowers: June-July

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1m

     Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Deutzia varieties like ‘Mont Rose’ and ‘Rosea’

    🌸Flowers: April – June

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial

    📏 Height: Up to 1m

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Escallonia varieties such as ‘Apple Blossom’, ‘Iveyi’ and ‘Pink Elle‘.

    🌸Flowers: June-July and usually again in September

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Fuchsia varieties such as ‘Tom Thumb’ ‘Genii’ and ‘Mrs Popple’

    🌸Flowers: June-October

    🌞 Position: Full sun  or partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Fertile, moist well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Haliumium libanotis 

    🌸Flowers: June-August

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m

    Soil: Well-drained soil

    Pot size: 3L,10L (subject to availability)

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    Hydrangea varieties 

    🌸Flowers: June-September (depending on variety)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade (depending on variety)

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m (depending on variety)

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil, fertile soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L,  10L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Lavatera varieties such as ‘Rosea’ and ‘Baby Barnsley’

    🌸Flowers: June-September

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 2m

    Soil: Fertile -well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Lavender varieties such as ‘Hidcote’ and ‘munstead’.

    🌸Flowers: June-September

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m

    Soil:  Fertile -well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Potentilla varieties such as ‘Red Robin’ ‘Lovely pink’ ‘Goldfinger’ ‘Abbotswood’ and ‘Tangerine’ 

    🌸Flowers: May – October

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m depending on the variety

    Soil: moderately fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 7.5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Philadelphus varieties such as ‘Virginal’ ‘Belle Etoile’ and ‘starbright’ 

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Spirea ‘snowmound’

    🌸Flowers: June – July

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  ( subject to availability)

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    Syringa varieties 

    🌸Flowers: May-June

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 4m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 12L, 20L + (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Viburnum opulus ‘Compactum’

    🌸Flowers: June – August

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m

    Soil: Moist, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Weigela varieties

    🌸Flowers: May-June

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m depending on the variety

    Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Pot size: 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L  (depending on variety and subject to availability)

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    Please note the above plants listed are subject to availability and is not an exhaustive list of what is available, please contact your sales rep direct for specific requests.

    Click here to view our list of June herbaceous plants looking good

    Posted 7th Jun 4:42pm
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  6. The Growers Guide - Creating an environmentally friendly garden

    The Growers Guide - Creating an environmentally friendly garden

    The worlds changing climate has many of us questioning what we could do to make our life more environmentally friendly, whether that’s in our day to day life, the house or garden, below we have some great tips on how you can create an environmentally friendly garden.

    Limit your use of water 

    Limiting the use of clean water is important for the environment, so why not recycle natural sources that can be used to water plants in any garden by installing a water butt.

    To preserve your water, we recommend directing the supply to the roots of plants without wasting it on the leaves or flowers. Removing weeds will ensure the water is going towards your plants and is not being wasted further.

    There have been several hosepipe bans in place across the country during the warmest periods of the year. You can help conserve your water usage by using a watering can in its place, and considering the time of day, watering during the warmest part of the day would mean the water is more likely to evaporate in the heat and be ineffective. Prioritise young plants and seedlings over more established plants as these will survive long periods without water.

    View our guide to watering in dry weather here 

    Use drought-tolerant plants

    Opting to use drought-tolerant plants, that require less watering, will be better for the environment in helping to save water.

    There are plenty of options for any garden. If you’re looking for plants that do well in full sun, we’d recommend shrub varieties like lavender, rosemary and buddleia, or herbaceous varieties like Iris, Kniphofia and salvia. Alternatively, there are drought resistant plants that do well for shaded areas, such as Sarcococca, Hypericum, Euphorbia and Digitalis.

    Plant a tree

    When it comes to purifying the air, and helping to reduce air pollution in built-up areas, we recommend planting a tree to decrease carbon dioxide levels. Choose varieties with larger leaves and wide crowns to maximise photosynthesis. Trees can also provide additional benefits such as providing a home for local wildlife and reducing noise pollution.

    Include native plants  

    Fill your garden projects with as many native plants as possible to attract wildlife into your garden.  Click here to view a list of native trees and shrubs by the RHS.

    Introduce pollinators

    One-third of our crop supply in the UK relies on bees pollinating our plants. By introducing stock that bees are highly attracted to helps encourage them, and other pollinators, into your garden.

    Click here to view the growers choice of pollinator-friendly plants.

    Protect wildlife habitats

    Looking after our environment doesn’t just mean caring for space itself, but also giving nature a helping hand. The colder months of the year can be a struggle for local wildlife, but by building birdhouses with feeders, log piles for hedgehogs or even insect hotels, we can provide a safe space for them all year round.

    Make organic compost

    Having an environmentally friendly garden means having space where you are largely self-sufficient. Make your own compost by using recycled elements from your garden or home, including leaves, grass cuttings, branches, natural debris, leftover fruit peels, eggshells and old newspapers.

    Grow your own fruit and vegetables

    Growing your own food is not only cost-effective but rewarding. The fresh fruit and vegetables taste great while helping to reduce the environmental impact the shipping and plastic waste has from produce sold in supermarkets. Start with something easy to grow. such as carrots, potatoes, apples or berries, before tackling more challenging produce.

    Make your garden accessible  

    Make your garden accessible to decline species such as hedgehogs, modern gardens with walls and fences make it difficult for them and other ground-dwelling creatures.

     

    Posted 4th Jun 9:16am
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  7. The Growers Guide - Watering in dry weather

    The Growers Guide - Watering in dry weather

    During warm and drought weather, it can be hard to ensure plants are getting the water they need to survive. Read our guide on watering in dry weather below.

    Drought (the definition for a gardener): drought is considered to occur in a garden when the soil moisture in the plant root zone is exhausted, and the plants wilt—a continuous period of 15 days when there has been no measurable rain.

    •  In hot weather, water in the cool of the early morning, in the evening, the soil and the atmosphere will still be very warm and applied water will quickly evaporate.
    •  Frequent light watering does not penetrate deep into the soil. Soak the soil to a good depth from time to time. This will encourage deeper rooting and the tapping of water at lower levels.
    •  After a heavy watering, apply a mulch around the plant or tree, leaving 4-6 inches around the main stem to prevent fungal attacks. Remember that fine water-absorbing roots are not under the trunk, but towards the edge of the plant canopy.
    •  If water is not available, it has been traditional to hoe the surface soil, but not deeply as you may be cutting surface roots. A crumbly, hoed surface will prevent transpiration from lower depths and facilitate the rapid absorption of rain, or water, which is applied.
    • When watering with a hose, use a rose in the end so that there is no solid water stream, as this would contribute to water run-off and erosion.
    •  There are now many good water sprinklers on the market that have a wide range of spray patterns for efficient watering in a round or rectangular pattern. A sprinkler in conjunction with a water timer in the hose line will make the whole process so much easier.
    •  Seep-hoses are particularly useful as they can be wound amongst plants that are susceptible to drought and left down all year.
    •  Whenever possible, use rainwater (collected in a rainwater butt) for watering lime hating plants, such as rhododendrons, camellias, etc.
    •  It’s worth noting that half an inch of rain equals approx. 13,600 galls/acre or 2.8 gall/sq.
    •  In hot weather, water container pots once a day.
    •  Remember, waterlogging can be as bad as drought!

    Posted 3rd Jun 4:06pm
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  8. The Growers Choice: Fragrant Garden Plants

    The Growers Choice: Fragrant Garden Plants

    Want to add fragrant plants to your garden project? has your client asked to surround the patio or decking area with fragrant plants? or do they want to add scent to their borders? Check out our guide to some of our favourite fragrant garden plants below.

    Lavender varieties

    Lavender plants have been used for thousands of years for their scent in the garden, including their use in essential oils with links to the Romans using it to perfume their baths.  It has also been used for many years, dried out and put in small packets to freshen linen, closets and drawers.

    Ideal for a pathway or patio pot flowering from July through to September, giving you months of fresh fragrance to enjoy.

    🌸 Flowers: July – September

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Dependent on variety

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L and 10L pots (depending on variety)

     

    Trachelospermum jasminoides

    A climbing plant famous for its smell which is often recognised in many perfumes. They prefer full sun and flower from June – August. Its dark green leaves turn to bronze come autumn. Add to a sunny positioned wall or fence near your front or back door.

    🌸 Flowers: June – August

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 9m

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 5L, 10L and 20L pots (subject to availability)

    Syringa varieties

    While Syringa’s flowering period is short, its fragrance and bloom size makes up for it. Available in various colours, lilacs generally herald the beginning of warmer weather. Plant in a sunny well-drained spot for best results.

    🌸 Flowers: May – June

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 5m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained, neutral to alkaline soil

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L, 20L + pots. (subject to availability)

    Sarcococca hookeriana ‘Winter Gem’

    Highly scented white flowers sit above large glossy, rich green leaves come late winter – early spring. It is a great addition to a shady border or a shaded patio spot where you can smell it every day.

    🌸 Flowers: Late winter-early spring

    🌞Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5m

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained, moist soil

    Daphne aureomarginata

    Looking for a scented cloud on your walk through the garden? Daphne aureomarginata is another fantastic fragrant plant that flowers from January until April. It is known for its pale pink flowers and thrives best in a sunny sheltered position.

    🌸 Flowers: December – March

    🌞Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.5m

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained, humus-rich soil

    Rose varieties

    Some rose varieties, such as Rosa de L’hay, are known for their masses of heavily perfumed flowers rich purple in colour. It Would look great at the back of a shrub border and will flower from July to September.

    🌸 Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun –  Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2.5m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained, moist humus-rich soil

    Head to our solutions page for more hints and tips here 

    Posted 3rd Jun 11:14am
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  9. The Growers Choice: Late summer blooms

    The Growers Choice: Late summer blooms

    Spring and early summer aren’t the only months where plants are in bloom choose from this selection of ‘late summer blooms’ for plants that go into late summer and beyond.

    Crocosmia varieties

    Choose Crocosmia varieties such as ‘Lucifer’  or ‘George Davidsion’ with funnel shaped flowers as bright as a red tomato, or as yellow as a lemon in ‘George Davidson’s case these plants flower from August to September. Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ will work best in a sunny herbaceous border alongside other bold colours, like Achillea and will reach up to 1m tall.

    🌸 Flowers: August- September

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m tall (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Well drained, Hummus-rich soil

    Available in 2L, 3L and 5L pots (depending on variety and availability)

    Hydrangea paniculata varieties

    Fantastic specimen plants ideal for a patio pot or mixed border in full sun – partial shade with some paniculata varieties flowering until October.

    🌸 Flowers: July – October (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m tall (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Moist, well drained, Hummus-rich soil

    Available in 3L, 5L, 7.5L and 10L pots (depending on variety and availability)

    Sedum spectabile

    A great addition to the front of a sunny border and a great source of late nectar for pollinators flowering from August to October with pink flowers on top of grey-green succulent leaves.

    🌸 Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.45m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l and 3L pots (depending on variety) 

    Echinacea varieties

    Echinaceas are a firm favourite of butterflies with its fantastic daisy Iike, bright flowers and orange centres. Flowering from July to– September, it’s a must have for your late flowering border.

    🌸 Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l and 3L pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Rudbeckia varieties

    Rudbeckia varieties such as ‘Goldsturm’ are a great addition to a late sunny summer border and will look great planted amongst ornamental grasses.

    🌸 Flowers: August – October (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 075m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Agapanthus varieties

    Globes of trumpet-shaped blue flowers on straight green stems that will last until September. They look fantastic in a pot or summer border.

    🌸 Flowers: July – September (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

    Verbena bonariensis

    Tall branching stems with clusters of lilac-purple flowers from June to September ideal for the front or middle of a border in full sun.

    🌸 Flowers: June – September (depending on variety)

    🌞Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 2m  (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, well-drained soil

    Available in 2l  pots (depending on variety) 

     

    Posted 2nd Jun 3:29pm
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  10. What to do in the garden this June

    What to do in the garden this June

    With warmer temperatures and extra sunlight this month, there’s plenty to be doing in the garden, from mowing the lawn to trimming topiary and filling in your borders with herbaceous or bedding plants.

    Check out our June gardening tips below, put together by Chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1)Continue mowing established lawns frequently. Raise the blades a little in parched weather. Treat with weed killer if necessary. Remember to water new lawns in parched weather. Consider laying paving as stepping-stones in areas of high wear.

    2)  Dead-head roses and other plants with a succession of flowers to ensure large blooms and a constant display through the summer. Cut rose stems back to an actively growing bud. Seversuckers from the rootstock by tearing them off, or if too large, cut with a very sharp knife as close to the stem as possible.

    3) Complete the planting of hardy annuals, ensure they are well watered in and kept watered for the first month.  Ensure that slugs and snails do not cause too much damage by removing them by hand or treating them with appropriate slug and snail killer.

    4)   Lightly clip box edging and topiary to remove wandering shoots. Remember to provide feed and water, particularly if they are growing in containers. Trim back the flowering growth of Erica carnea varieties and top dress with peat.

    5)  Check the borders for unexpected gaps and fill them with bedding plants or herbaceous plants, remembering to water them in the coming weeks!

    6)  Plant out young dahlias now the potential for frost is past. Keep well-watered and control greenfly. Apply a mulch to conserve moisture and reduce weeds.

    7)  Water containers whenever the surface feels dry to the touch. Add a liquid feed to the water unless you have incorporated a long-release fertilizer earlier in the season.

    8)  Bright red lily beetles are already on the rampage again. Look for them on the upper surface of lily and Fritillaria leaves, where they take notches out of the leaves. They appear to move back down to soil level in the evening but need catching in daylight. They don’t fly, but any disturbance sends them falling back to ground level, where they remain with their black underside upwards.  Eggs are laid on the underside of the leaves, and larvae live within a mound of their own frass.

    9)  Remove self-sown seedlings of ash and sycamore before they become too established.

    10)  Take softwood or semi-ripe cuttings of cotoneasters, deutzias, fuchsias and philadelphus—root in a glasshouse or cold frame.

    11)  Reduce the number of floating plant leaves in the pond to allow light into the lower regions.

    12)  Tie in the soft young growth of raspberries, be careful not to break them off!.

    13)  Pinch out the growing tips of annual plants to encourage bushiness.

    14)  Sow winter pansies, primulas, violas and Brompton stocks under glass. Foxgloves and wallflowers can be sown outside in a weed-free area of the border to flower next year.

    15)  Earth-up main-crop potatoes and lift early potatoes when they have reached the size of a hen’s egg.

    16)  When watering greenhouse plants, spray a mist over benches, paths, and windows, and open doors and windows on hot days to help reduce the incidence of red spider.

    17)  Keep tying in the long shoots of climbing plants. Tie stronger stems to trellis or posts.

    Posted 1st Jun 1:44pm
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  11. Centenary plant donations help Yorkshire charities bloom

    Centenary plant donations help Yorkshire charities bloom

    We have donated hundreds of plants to Yorkshire charities as part of our centenary celebration.

    We celebrate our  100th birthday in June and are marking our centenary year with a donation of plants to a different charity each month.

    So far, we have gifted hundreds of plants worth more than £600 to Henshaw’s in  Knaresborough, Hope Pastures, Leeds, York Teaching Hospital Charity and, most recently, the Blue Cross at Thirsk.

    Plant varieties recently donated include a wide range of shrubs and herbaceous from Lavandula Hidcote to ‘Achillea’ new white 3L, and Digitalis dalmation rose 2L, Nandina Obsessed 5L, Paeonia  ‘white wings’ 2L, Phlox Emerald cushion blue 2L, Scabiosa ‘Butterfly Blue’ 2L and Vinca minor 2L.

    Blue Cross Animal Welfare Assistant, Lyn Henderson said: “The team at Thirsk Blue Cross would like to thank Johnson’s of Whixley for their generous donation of plants for our site. It’s lovely that everyone who visits our centre will benefit from them and they are already creating a welcoming environment.”

    Hope Pastures Sanctuary Manager, Leonnie Martin said: “We were absolutely thrilled to be chosen as the winning charity from Johnson’s of Whixley and the prize selection of plants was amazing.  We have already installed some in our secret garden and we are using the others to create a peaceful piece of garden at the top of our site as a celebration of the people who leave us a legacy to help us do our work.”

    The last year has been a challenge for many charities; people haven’t had the funds to donate like they usually would. It’s great to give something back to local charities and help their outdoor spaces bloom.

    Posted 1st Jun 9:32am
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