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  1. The Growers Choice: Intruder proof hedging

    The Growers Choice: Intruder proof hedging

    Do you require hedging that will act as a deterrent? these hedging varieties offer a fantastic deterring method that will help keep human and animal intruders away. A great alternative to a wall or fence.

    Prunus spinosa

    A prickly native hedging plant covered in thorns, great as a mixed native hedge with bright white flowers in Spring followed by green foliage and sloes which appear in Autumn. (Great for making Sloe Gin if you get to the sloes before the birds)

    Available as a bare root transplant at 40-60cm tall up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3.5m

    🌱 Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

     

    Crataegus monogyna

    A popular native hedging plant is known for its large thorns which can be seen after its green leaves fall in Autumn. It is also known for its white scented flowers which can be seen in Spring.

    Available in bare-root sizes from 40-60cm up to 200cm tall and in container pots after the bare root season.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 10 metres

    🌱 Soil: any soil (except water-logged sites)

     

    Berberis varieties 

    Make a great intruder proof hedge due to its prickly foliage and are available in various colours and sizes as evergreens and deciduous varieties.

    They are available In 2L and 10L pots.

     

    Ilex aquifolium 

    A variety that is known for its spikey dark, glossy, green leaves which make it a great intruder proof hedging variety.  Commonly known as Holly, this plant has an abundance of red berries during autumn and winter attracting birds to feast.

    Available from a p9 pot up to a 20L.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – Full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 12 metres +

    🌱 Soil: normal, clay or chalk soils

     

    Rosa canina 

    A prickly native variety that is fast growing with pale pink flowers in Summer. Bright Red rose hips come autumn, which are attractive to birds.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 2 metres +

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Pyracantha varieties

    Known for their colourful berries available in yellow, reds and oranges which will last from Autumn through to Spring if left untouched by birds. Great against a back wall these Pyracantha will stop intruders. Available potted throughout the year.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Posted 26th Mar 12:12pm
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  2. Plants that look good this March

    Plants that look good this March

    With spring officially here, it’s time to start making the most of your garden and landscaping projects with some of our favourite March flowering plants that are sure to add interest to your project this spring and beyond.

    Viburnum tinus ‘Lisarose’

    An evergreen shrub with year-round interest that will produce redbuds and clusters of soft pink flowers. Ideal for brightening up a part shaded area of the garden over winter and into spring when little else is flowering.

    🌸 Flowers: Late November – April

    ☀️Position: Full sun – partial shade

    Available in 2L, 5L and 10L subject to availability.

    Vinca minor

    This groundcover shrub is filled with blue-violet flowers right now that will last through to September. Vincas are great low growing ground cover plants that are great at suppressing weeds and great at the front of a border.

    ☀️Position: Full sun – partial shade
    🌸Flowers: Late March – September

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    Pieris ‘Passion’

    An eye-catching evergreen shrub with generous pink-red bell-shaped flowers from March-May growing in full sun – partial shade it’s perfect in a large pot or on a patio.

    Available in 3L and 5L pots subject to availability.

    🌸Flowers: March-May

    🌞  Position: Full sun – partial shade

    Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’

    A striking spring-flowering plant which is smothered in golden blooms from March-April. A great addition to the back of a border or as an informal hedge.

    🌞  Position: Full sun – Light Shade

    🌸Flowers: February – April

    Available in 2L, 4L and 10L pots subject to availability.

    Skimmia Rubella

    Are you in need of some autumn/winter colour? Skimmia Rubella are known for their dark red flower buds that are produced in autumn and last through to winter until the flowers open in spring — an excellent plant for a patio pot or border.

    Available in 2L, 5L, 7.5L and 10L pots subject to availabilty.

    🌸 Flowers: March – May

    ☀️ Position: partial – full shade

    Erysimum ‘Bowles’s Mauve’

    A long-flowering semi-evergreen with narrow, grey-green leaves. This perennial produces spikes of purple flowers from late February to July and will make a great addition to a long flowering sunny border.

    🌸 Flowers: February – July

    ☀️ Position: Full sun

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    Euphorbia wulfenii

    Is filled with huge heads of yellow-green flowers with ‘bronze eyes’ from late March-May that tower above its bluish-green foliage. Great at the back of a sunny border.

    Available in 2L pots subject to availability.

    🌸Flowers:  Late March-May

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    Prunus ‘Kojo-no-mai’

    Is a great addition to a small garden, it’s wiry twigs burst into life in March when buds open to display pale pink flower. It’s green leaves turn to glorious shades of red and orange in Autumn.

    🌸Flowers: March-April

    ☀️ Position:  Full sun

    Available in 3L, 5L and 10L pots subject to availability.

     

    For further advise, hints and tips go to our solutions page here

    Posted 17th Mar 10:50am
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  3. The Growers Choice: Hedging for shade

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for shade

    Some plants can survive with only a few hours of sun a day, whether that be early morning or late evening. Shade can be caused by a number of reasons from buildings, walls, trees and of course, the gardens natural position. Below we have put some together a list of hedging varieties that can tolerate shade from Taxus to Ilex.

    1.Taxus Baccata 

    A dark green evergreen hedging variety with needle-like leaves, ideal for your garden project’s shaded location, this variety is commonly known as ‘Yew’. It is a popular variety often used in stately homes grounds and private gardens. This hedging variety is easy to trim and can be used to create shapes for a statement feature or simply cut to create a clean line.

    Red berries are seen come Autumn, which are loved by birds but harmful to humans, pets and livestock if eaten. This slow-growing variety prefers fertile, well-drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    🌸Flowers: April

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 20 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    2. Ilex aquifolium 

    A variety that is known for its spikey dark, glossy, green leaves which make it a great intruder proof hedging variety.  Commonly known as Holly, this plant has an abundance of red berries during autumn and winter attracting birds to feast.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – Full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 12 metres +

    🌱 Soil: normal, clay or chalk soils

    3. Buxus sempervirens

    Are a great low growing hedging plant that only requires clipping once or twice a year. Perfect for edging a path or border these hedging plants will only grow 10-20cm per year. Buxus is often used in a formal garden and is great shaped. Plant in partial shade for best results.

    🌞 Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 1.5L, 2L,  3L, 5L, 10L +pot sizes  and as cones and balls  (all sizes subject to availability)

    4. Aucuba japonica ‘Crotonifolia

    This plant is full of thick glossy green leaves with pale yellow splashes and is particularly popular in shady areas of the garden where little else will grow. A great plant to create a dense hedge.

    🌞 Position:  Sun – Full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 3 metres

    🌱 Soil: Most soil types (except waterlogged or alkaline soils)

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes (all sizes subject to availability)

    5. Prunus Rotundifolia 

    A vigorous, dense evergreen shrub suitable for almost all locations. Large, glossy green leaves make this a go-to plant above other Prunus varieties.  Its density makes it ideal for screening for privacy, and it is a great barrier to noise and wind. Commonly known as laurel, this hedging variety grows up to 60cm per year and is relatively happy in most soil conditions.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as rootball and bare-root plants from November – March (all sizes subject to availability)

    🌸Flowers: April

    🌞 Position: Full sun – full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, moist soil, do not plant in shallow chalk

    6. 3. Elaeagnus x ebbingei

    A tough evergreen shrub with dark green leaves with a silver speckle and attractive silver underside. This robust evergreen variety is ideal for a shady, dry, windy seaside site.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pots. (all sizes subject to availability)

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 4 metres

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well-drained

    Other plants to consider as shaded hedging varieties include: Berberis, Pyracantha and Leylandii.

    Unsure how many you need to plant per m? check out our hedging guide here

    Posted 12th Mar 10:20am
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  4. The Growers Choice: Hedging for small gardens

    The Growers Choice: Hedging for small gardens

    In small gardens, most people favour a wall or fence, however, there are plants that can create privacy or a boundary without taking over too much room, here’s just a few of our favourite hedging plants for small gardens below.

    1. Taxus baccata is a dark, evergreen low growing hedging plant that creates a dense screen in a garden they can be clipped back to keep a low formal hedge and will grow in sun to partial shade.

    Available in 2L, 3L, 5L, 10L + pot sizes and as a rootball from November – March

    🌸Flowers: April

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 20 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    2. Ilex crenata – This evergreen hedging variety is a great alternative to Buxus hedging, resistant to box blight and not prone to leaf scorch when pruned. It can be kept as a small neat hedge and would make a great addition to a path or border.

    🌸Flowers: May

    🌞 Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    Available in 2L and 5L pots and other sizes subject to availability 

    3. Lavender Hidcote – why not choose a lavender plant for a scented small hedge, Perfect for the edge of a path or small hedge at the front of a garden. This plant will also attract pollinators to your garden. Head to our pollinator-friendly plants guide for more bee loving plant varieties.

    🌸Flowers: July – September

    🌞 Position: Full sun

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    4. Buxus sempervirens are a great low growing hedging plant that only requires clipping once or twice a year. Perfect for edging a path or border these hedging plants will only grow 10-20cm per year. Buxus is often used in a formal garden and is great shaped. (see our Buxus alternative blog post if you are concerned about box blight)

    🌞 Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 5 metres

    🌱 Soil: well-drained, fertile soil

    5. Euonymus ‘Jean Hughes’ is a fantastic dense, compact shrub that can be used in borders and hedging, a great new alternative to Buxus.

    🌸Flowers: July – September

    🌞 Position:  Sun- Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m

    🌱 Soil: moist normal soil

    6. Hebe ‘Red Edge’ – A small evergreen shrub that will make an attractive low hedging variety in full sun – partial shade.

    🌞 Position: Full sun – Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 045m

    🌱 Soil: moist, well-drained slightly alkaline soil

    For more advise on plants for certain locations, head to our solutions page here

    Posted 11th Mar 4:34pm
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  5. The Growers Choice: Plants for shade

    The Growers Choice: Plants for shade

    Some projects and gardens arent always blessed with full sun positions, the good news is that there’s plenty of shade-loving plants that we supply from Vinca to Helleborus, see eight of our top-selling shade plants below.

    Vinca Minor – A great low growing spreading ground cover with lavender-purple flowers flowering from April to September – great for suppressing weeds and great at the front of a border in partial shade.

    🌸 Flowers: April – September

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.2 metres

    🌱 Soil: Very dry soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    2. Hostas do great in partial shade and thrive in damp soil conditions but be sure to keep the slugs and snails away which create holes in the leaves. The darker the foliage of the hosta the better it will do in the shade.

    🌸 Flowers: July-August

    🌞Position: Partial or full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m (depends on the variety)

    🌱 Soil: moist, well drained soil.

    Available in 2L and 5L pots.

    3. Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’ – Great to add a splash of colour at the end of summer into mid-autumn. These Anemone will flower from August to October and grow up to 120cm tall. Best at the back or the middle of a border.

    🌸 Flowers: August – October

    🌞Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1.2m

    🌱 Soil: moist, well drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L and 5L pots (subject to availability) 

    4. Geranium Rozanne – A perfect plant doing well in partial shade to full sun, it’s great for underplanting or filling in any empty gaps in your border, adding beautiful purple flowers from June through to September.

    🌸 Flowers: June – October

    🌞Position: Sun – Partial Shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6m

    🌱 Soil: fertile, well drained soil.

    Available in 2L, 3L and 5L pots (subject to availability) 

    5. Ferns – Not only are ferns low maintenance, but they also thrive in a shady spot. Try Dryopteris filix-mas or Polystichum setiferum for your shady planting plan.

    🌞Position: Partial Shade

    📏 Height: Up to 1m + (depending on variety)

    🌱 Soil: moist, rich soil

    6. Brunnera Jack Frost – I absolutely love the silvery foliage of a Brunnera ‘Jack Frost’. They would look great next to tiarellas, heucheras and ferns. Plant at the front of your shady border.

    🌸 Flowers: April-May

    🌞Position: Partial Shade

    📏 Height: 0.4m

    🌱 Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist soil

     

    7. Helleborus  – A great winter/spring addition to your shaded spot in a garden that will provide a much-needed source of pollen for bees and butterflies once they come out of hibernation.

    🌸 Flowers: January – February

    🌞Position: Partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.3 metres

    🌱 Soil: Neutral to alkaline soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    8. Astrantia – Are a great addition to a shaded area of the garden including under trees or in a shaded border.

    🌸 Flowers: June to August

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.75 metres

    🌱 Soil: Fertile, moist, humus rich soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Head over to our solutions page for more of ‘The Growers Choice’ here

    Posted 11th Mar 3:16pm
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  6. The Growers Choice: Plants and Trees for pollinators

    The Growers Choice: Plants and Trees for pollinators

    With the decline of bees and butterflies, we thought we would share some of our favourite pollinator-friendly plants and trees for spring, summer and autumn along with some tips.

    Tips

    • Always grow a mixture of plants that will provide year-round interest for pollinators.
    • Try to stick to single flowers. Double or multi petalled flowers hide pollen and nectar.
    • Go organic and avoid pesticides
    • Put up nest sites and bug hotels for solitary bees.
    • Provide water for pollinators.
    • Allow lawn weeds to flower by cutting less often.

    Spring plants and trees for pollinators

    In a warmer spring, butterflies and bees start emerging from their autumn/winter hibernation and rely on pollen and nectar to survive. These trees and plants are pollinator-friendly for this specific season:

    Helleborus (Christmas rose) – a great winter/spring addition to your shaded spot in a garden that will provide a much-needed source of pollen for bees and butterflies once they come out of hibernation.

    Mahonia ‘Winter Sun’ – this plant is found covered in bees during early spring. Their bright yellow flowers appear from November to March and are happiest when placed in full or partial shade.

    Apple and crab apple trees – these trees rely on pollinators, without them, the trees would not bear fruit. The beautiful blossom from these varieties, such as Malus Domestica, provide a much-needed spring feast for bees.

    Salix caprea (Goat/ Pussy willow) – another one that is hugely important to providing an early source of pollen for pollinators is this tree thanks to its golden catkins that come out in March. A popular variety for queen bees, and mining bees.

    Crocus – Bumblebees are often seen not only collecting the pollen but sheltering inside the flower overnight.

    Summer plants for pollinators

    Moving into the summer season, these plant varieties are great options for pollinators to use during the warmer months of the year.

    Echinacea’s (coneflower) – a great option for bees and butterflies as they pump out as much nectar in the morning as the afternoon, unlike other plant varieties.

    Buddleia (butterfly bush) – the clue is in the name with this one as this really is covered in butterflies come June a great addition to a sunny border.

    Lavender – an obvious (and popular) one as it has been loved by pollinators for hundreds of years. Place it in a sunny, dry and well-drained position.

    Digitalis (foxgloves) – its bell-shaped flowers are very popular with bees, especially the bumblebee. Plant these in dappled shade for it to grow well.

    Geraniums – this plant has a long blooming season which makes it a great addition to the garden for bees. Choose varieties such as Geranium Johnsons blue that will flower through to September.

    Verbena – a plant that produces lots of nectar from July to October, they are loved by hoverflies, butterflies, bees and even dragonflies – a great addition to the middle or back of a border.

    Salvias – Salvias are a real magnet to bees, butterflies and even hummingbirds with some varieties flowering from late spring through to Autumn, a great source of nectar for pollinators.

    Escallonia ‘Pink Elle’ – Last summer our Escallonia ‘Pink Elle’ were full of butterflies from June through to August. Escallonia’s not only looked great in summer but their dark glossy foliage looks great throughout the year.

    Autumn plants and trees for pollinators

    Moving into the colder end of the year for a change of seasons brings another round of trees and plants that are great for pollinators in the autumn.

    Sedum Autumn Joy – this will flower from late summer into early autumn where they are frequently visited by butterflies and bees.

    Hedera (Ivy) – this is vital in helping to aid bees in the late season with its mature plants flowering in October and November.

    Anemone Honorine Jobert – an option that will not only brighten up that shaded part of your garden but a favourite of bees as it flowers from August to October.

    Heptacodium miconoides – with clusters of white flowers, this tree provides a great source of pollen from September to November when other varieties have stopped flowering.

    Posted 11th Mar 1:30pm
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  7. The Growers Choice: Ground cover plants

    The Growers Choice: Ground cover plants

    Ground cover plants are a great addition to open landscapes and gardens of all sizes by filling in gaps and brightening up bare patches beneath trees. Here’s a list of some of our favourite groundcover plants.

    Alchemilla Mollis

    Show off their rounded light green leaves with green-yellow small flowers. It thrives positioned in full sun or partial shade, growing up to 1.5 metres. Flowering from June to September, it is an easy-to-use perennial making it a favourable option for ground cover in borders.

    🌸 Flowers: June – September

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.6 metres

    🌱 Soil: Hummus-rich soil

    Available in 2L and 5L pots. 

    Vinca Minor

    One of our favourite ground cover plants is the evergreen Vinca Minor. It is well-known for its capability in ground-covering flaunting its star-like blue flowers which can be seen from April to September. Planting the Vinca Minor in very dry soil exposed to full sun or partial shade will allow them to flourish.

    🌸 Flowers: April – September

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.2 metres

    🌱 Soil: Very dry soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    Persicaria ‘Darjeeling Red’

    Is a semi-evergreen perennial, well-known for its crimson upright flowers. It can be seen in the Autumn months from September to November, growing up to half a metre tall. For best results, soil moisture must be moist but well-drained.

    🌸 Flowers: September – November

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 0.5 metres

    🌱 Soil: Moist but well-drained

    Available in 2L and 5L pots.

    Waldsteinia Ternata

    Is a semi-evergreen perennial with yellow flowers standing out against their dark green foliage. They work well alongside a path or when used for edging a border under a tree or banking. Flowering in Spring and Summer, they will require full to partial shade in most types of soil.

    🌸 Flowers: April – June

    🌞Position: Full shade – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 10cm 

    🌱 Soil: Moist but well-drained

    Available in 2L pots.

    Cornus Canadensis

    Also known as Creeping Dogwood, blossom white flowers in late Spring to early Summer followed by clusters of bright red berries in Autumn once the flowers have faded. They are best grown in full sun to partial shade.

    🌸 Flowers: May – June 

    🌞Position: Full sun – partial shade

    📏 Height: Up to 10cm

    🌱 Soil: Moist but well-drained

    Available in 2L pots.

    Hedera Hibernica

    An evergreen, climbing plant which thrives in most soil types and can be used for ground cover once the shoots are pinned down. It is fast-growing so will require more attention than other ground cover varieties to stop them from growing out of control.

    🌸 Flowers: October – November

    🌞Position: Full sun – full shade

    📏 Height: Up to 10 metres

    🌱 Soil: Alkaline moist but well-drained soil

    Available in 2L pots.

    For further solutions for your garden head to ‘the growers choice’ section of our website here

    Posted 8th Mar 3:45pm
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  8. What our staff say - National Careers Week

    What our staff say - National Careers Week

    This week is National Careers Week so we decided to question a few of our existing staff members about their careers at Johnsons, see what they had to say below.

    Mick Huby 

    1)What was the year you started at Johnsons? I started on the 15th June 1976, First job was hoeing conifers at Cattal with Bill Beasley, Harry Kettlewell, Eric Crowl and Jim Bryon.

    2)What has made you stay here all these years? Still like the different challenges of growing new stock and seeing the good results. I like working outside. No one day has been the same and the friendships I have made with the other people who work here.

    3))How has Johnson’s supported you in your career? From starting straight away from school way back in 1976 I have been helped and backed all the way by the company right the way through my apprenticeship and college years. I have been on many courses over the years from ploughing fields, grafting trees up to NVQ and management training.  They have also sent me on nursery visits not only in the UK but to growers in France, Holland, Belgium, and Germany and Italy to help gain further knowledge on how the business works.

    4)What makes Johnson’s a good employee? I think that even though the company as grown so big over the years it is still a family run business and because of that reason, it cares for its staff as one big team.

    5)How has Johnson’s supported you in your career? From starting straight away from school way back in 1976 I have been helped and backed all the way by the company right the way through my apprenticeship and college years. I have been on many courses over the years from ploughing fields, grafting trees up to NVQ and management training.  They have also sent me on nursery visits not only in the UK but to growers in France, Holland, Belgium, and Germany and Italy to help gain further knowledge on how the business works.

    Claire Horner

    How many years have you been at Johnsons? Nearly 22 years.  I started work in the summer of 1999, I remember because it was the summer when we has a total solar eclipse.

    1)What do you enjoy most about Johnsons? The thing I enjoy the most about working here at JOW is that there are never two days alike. It’s certainly not boring.

    2)How have Johnsons supported you? JoW has supported my career by providing access to training courses and arranging meetings with other growers in the UK and in Europe. This has helped me have a greater understanding of the ways a nursery works and how to manage people.

    3) What’s your proudest career moment?  For me, my proudest career moment is being part of a really successful cash and carry team, which is going from strength to strength. I feel I belong to this team and think that what we achieve together is greater than any individual success.

    My greatest personal achievement would be meeting my husband here at work. It was love across the muddy trenches; we met while working with the field-grown trees one winter; that was 18 years ago.

    4) How do Johnsons show their appreciation?  I love all the special days we have which are oriented around foody treats. From fish and chips to our month-end butties, it may not seem like much but these treats are what make me feel appreciated.

    Tom Watkins

    1)Length of service? Coming up to three years

    2)What do you enjoy most about being employed by Johnsons?

    I have always got great satisfaction from growing plants; understanding plant biology, refining plant husbandry techniques and experimenting with different IPM strategy. Being employed by Johnsons has allowed me to home in on these skills. With each day comes different challenges and obstacles to overcome, which allows for a steep learning curve.

    3)How have Johnson’s supported you in your career?

    I have always been given help and advice from the experienced members of staff that work for Johnsons. Any queries I have had have been met with a willing and helpful response. From this, my knowledge has grown considerably. On the other hand, any ideas I have had for trials or projects have always been supported.

    The company has also given me the opportunity to work with one of our Dutch young plant suppliers. This was a great experience for me as it allowed me to understand the importance of building a good relationship with other companies that we do business with, as well as being able to work with highly skilled growers and improve my knowledge of young plant production.

    4)How does working at Johnson’s compare to previous jobs you’ve had?

    Every company is different, and the fact that Johnsons is a family run business has been reiterated by the ethos of the company. I have always felt that everyone I have worked with has been willing to get stuck in together to get each task done. Help is always there when needed and, although the company is split into several departments, we all sing from the same hymn sheet.

    If you are interested in a career at Johnsons, keep an eye out for new positions on our careers page, or click here

    Posted 4th Mar 2:58pm
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  9. Plant supply to Europe's leading Science and Innovation Campus

    Plant supply to Europe's leading Science and Innovation Campus

    We have notched up another impressive plant supply during our 100th year, teaming up with Whiting Landscape ltd to enhance outdoor areas at the Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Europe’s leading science campus.

    The Oxfordshire-based science, innovation and technology campus is the size of a small town and occupies over 700 acres. More than 200 organisations are based there; it is home to a scientific community of more than 6,000 people.

    Many global firsts have been achieved at the campus, including the discovery of the world’s largest prime number, the building of Europe’s first energy-producing fission reactor and the first transistorised computer.

    The UK’s first Vaccines Manufacturing and Innovation Centre (VMIC) is a recent ground-breaking addition to the site.

    Harwell is now looking to expand, adding millions of square feet of new buildings, additional public areas and campus amenities – consolidating Harwell as one of the fastest-growing sites dedicated to science and technology in the UK.  At 48,000 sq. ft, Zeus is the latest building on campus to reach practical completion.

    Landscape construction and maintenance firm Whiting Landscape Ltd has been responsible for the soft landscaping package across new areas of the site, such as the area surrounding Zeus since 2016 with further work still ongoing.

    We have supplied thousands of plants across the campus including more than 4,000 to enhance the grounds of the Zeus building, a multi-occupancy R&D, laboratory, office and engineering hub. Varieties include Vinca minor, Polypodium vulgare, Ajuga reptens, Carex pendula and Hypericum androsaemum.

    Outside space around the Cobalt building has been improved by the planting of more than 5,000 plants and trees, including varieties such as 114 Pinus Mugo’ Mops’, 337 Fagus Sylvatica, 373 Rubus ‘Green Carpet’ and 205 Mahonia ‘Apollo’.

    Kevin Jarvis, buyer for Whiting Landscapes Ltd said: “Whiting Landscape have enjoyed an excellent working relationship with Johnsons of Whixley for the past 40 years.  This relationship continues to flourish and is based on the quick response offered at the tender stage through to the flexible and supportive approach at the point of delivery. With future development opportunities at Harwell we look forward to working alongside Johnsons to offer the client the best in terms of value and quality available to the market.”

    We are no stranger to campus plant supply, having worked with a number of universities including the Cambridge Medical Campus, Inverness Campus, University of Hull Campus, University of Newcastle Campus and Sheffield Hallam Campus.

    Posted 2nd Mar 10:08am
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  10. What to do in the garden during March

    What to do in the garden during March

    March Garden Reminders 

    Spring is on the way and by mid-March it will be light until 6 pm, allowing additional time for garden tasks. check out this month’s hints and tips put together by our chairman and horticulturist John Richardson.

    1) Prune decorative Cornus and Salix to within 5cm of the old shoots to encourage next year’s coloured winter stems. Don’t prune ‘Midwinter Fire’ types too hard.

    2)Use sharp shears to trim winter-flowering heathers as flowers fade away, trim to just below the bottom flowers.

    3) Arrange to plant summer flowering bulbs when planting condition is good. (Our cash & carry have a great range in-store at the moment)

    4) Finish pruning perennials that have not yet been cut back, don’t remove new green shoots.  It is still time to lift and divide large herbaceous clumps.  Re-plant or give away the outer sections of the clump and destroy the centre of the plant.

    5) Wait until Laburnums and Hawthorn are in full flower before planting out tender plants such as dahlias, begonias, fuchsias and pelargoniums.

    6) Hellebores are now very popular, lift seedlings around parent plant and pot up.

    7) Start preparing window boxes, always starting with new soil or compost.  Pot up using hardy annuals by the end of the month, tender annuals should not be planted until all possibility of frost is past.

    8) Forsythia will be in full flower this month. As the flower goes over, reduce older woody shoots by 25% and give a good much to ensure growth during the summer.

    9) New shrubs and herbaceous plants can be planted when soil conditions are good.

    10) Finish pruning soft fruit bushes by mid-month and give a high nitrogen feed.

    11) Lawns may require the first light cut towards the end of the month. Ensure that you brush off worm casts beforehand to prevent dulling the mower blades, and it may well, be worth-while not collecting the cutting so that a light mulch is left on the lawn.

    12) Apply a spring dressing of fertilizer high in nitrogen, medium potash towards the end of the month.

    13) When daffodils have flowered, remove dead heads to conserve energy.

    14) Prune strong growing Buddleias down to about 45cm for a good show by summer. Prune to 60-80cm for a denser but weaker overall growth.

    Check out our gardening calendar for further hints and tips here 

    Posted 2nd Mar 9:44am
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  11. Centenary Charity Giveaway - March 2021

    Centenary Charity Giveaway - March 2021

    Centenary Charity Giveaway – 12 plant donations up for grabs throughout 2021

    We are marking our centenary with a competition where 12 lucky Yorkshire charities will have the chance to win a plant donation worth over £150 each.

    At the end of each month in 2021, Johnsons will be giving away £150 worth of seasonal plants to a Yorkshire-based charity.

    To nominate a Yorkshire charity or enter your Yorkshire charity comment on this post or email marketing@nurserymen.co.uk quoting ‘Centenary Giveaway’ commenting on where this donation would be planted and why you deserve to win.

    Please read the full terms and conditions listed below before applying:

    March terms and conditions 

    • The promoter is Johnsons of Whixley Ltd
    • Entrants must comment on the post or email marketing@nurserymen.co.uk quoting ‘Centenary Giveaway’ letting us know where this donation would be planted and explaining why they deserve to win by Friday 9th April 2021.
    • The prize is open to Yorkshire charities – a valid charity number will be required to redeem the prize.
    • The March prize will include the following plants: 1 x Anemone Harmony Blue 2L, 1 x Anemone Harmony Orchid 2L, 1 x Aucuba ‘Crotonifolia’ 5L, Bergenia Harzkristall, 2 x Euphorbia Robbiae 2L,  1 x Forsythia ‘Lynwood Gold’, 1 x Hebe ‘Red Edge’ 2L, 1 x Hebe ‘Sutherlandii’ 2L, 1 x  Magnolia stellata 3L, 1 x Photinia Carre Rouge 5L, 1 x Phormium ‘Jester’ 2L, 1 x Picea glauca ‘conica’ 3L, 1 x Pieris ‘Debutante 3L, 1 x Pieris ‘Passion’ 3L, 1 x Prunus Kojo-no-mai 10L, 1 x Sarcococca ‘Winter Gem’ 5L,  1 x Scabiosa ‘Pink Mist’ 2L, 1 x Skimmia ‘Rubella’ 5L,  1 x Thuja ‘Tiny Tim’ 2L, 1 x Vinca minor ‘Atropurpurea’ 2L, 2 x Vinca minor 2L.
    • Charities based within North, West, South and East Yorkshire can apply.
    • The nominator must be aged 18 or over.
    • The promoter will deliver at a convenient time to the winning charity for free.
    • The winner must agree to use their charity name and share photos with Johnsons for marketing purposes.
    • The promoter will contact the winner directly by email, telephone or social media depending on submission.
    • The winner will also be announced on social media during early April 2021 please share your social media details on the application.
    • There is only one prize available per winner, per month (£150 worth of seasonal plants).
    • Entries who did not win will not be contacted.
    • The promoter will not take responsibility for any failure to the plant once the prize is received, replacements cannot be issued.
    • The Promoter reserves the right to withdraw this offer or amend these Terms and Conditions at any time without notice.
    • In the event of any dispute regarding the terms and conditions, the conduct, results and any other matters relating to this prize draw, the decision of the Promoter shall be final, and no correspondence or discussion shall be entered into.
    • By entering applicants agree to the above terms and conditions.

    Posted 31st Mar 1:11pm
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